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Oxford University Press

Four themes distinguish post-1950s East Asian cinemas and theaters from works in other parts of the world: Japanese innovations in sound and spectacle; Sinophone uses of Shakespeare for social reparation; the reception of South Korean presentations of gender identities in film and touring productions; and multilingual, disability, and racial discourses in cinema and diasporic theatre in Asian America, Singapore, and the UK.

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A study of ideas related to race throughout history. Distinguished by its breadth of coverage, both geographically and temporally, this book provides readers with an expansive, global understanding of the term from the classical period onwards:
• Intersections of Race and Gender
• Race and Social Theory Identity
• Ethnicity, and Immigration
• Whiteness and Legislative and Judicial Markings of Difference
• Race in South Africa, Israel, East Asia, Asian America
• Blackness in a Global Context
• Race in the History of Science
• Critical Race Theory

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At a time when Shakespeare is becoming increasingly globalized and diversified it is urgent more than ever to ask how this appropriated Shakespeare constructs ethical value across cultural and other fault lines. Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation is the first book to address the intersection of ethics, aesthetics, authority, and authenticity in a global context.

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This collection of essays offers a new understanding of local and global myths that have been constructed around Shakespeare in theatre, cinema, and television from the nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on a definition of myth as a powerful ideological narrative, this book examines historical, political, and cultural conditions of Shakespearean performances in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. The study of local identities and global icons uncovers dynamic relationships between regional, national, and transnational myths of Shakespeare.

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Due to Karl Marx’s frequent references in his political treatises, Shakespeare held a significant place in a number of communist and other left-authoritarian countries, including China and the USSR. And although there were themes in Shakespeare that turned out to be inconvenient for communist ideology, other Shakespearean plays were put into service. This volume explores the vicissitudes of artistic and political uses of Shakespeare in Soviet culture and ideology after the October Revolution in 1917, including in some of the continuing resonances of those uses since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

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For close to two hundred years, the ideas of Shakespeare have inspired incredible work in the literature, fiction, theater, and cinema of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. From the novels of Lao She and Lin Shu to Lu Xun’s search for a Chinese “Shakespeare,” and from Feng Xiaogang’s martial arts films to labor camp memoirs, Soviet-Chinese theater, Chinese opera in Europe, and silent film, Shakespeare has been put to work in unexpected places, yielding a rich trove of transnational imagery and paradoxical citations in popular and political culture.

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Alexa Alice Joubin

     Alexa Alice Joubin writes about race, gender, cultural globalization, Shakespeare, disability, and film and theatre. She teaches in the Departments of EnglishWomen's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Theatre, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., where she serves as founding Co-director of the Digital Humanities Institute. She holds affiliate appointments in the Institute for Korean Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies.

 

Writer

     The recipient of the Modern Language Association's Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies, she is the author of Shakespeare and East Asia (Oxford University Press, 2021), co-author of Race (with Martin Orkin, Routledge, 2018), editor-in-chief of The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Shakespeare, a general editor of The Shakespearean International Yearbook (a peer-reviewed annual publication), co-editor of Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance (Palgrave, 2018) and Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation (Palgrave, 2014), book review editor of Chinese Literature Today, and editor of the Palgrave book series on Global Shakespeares.

     At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she is Research Affiliate in Literature and the founding co-director of Global Shakespeares, an open-access performance video archive funded by the Mellon Foundation.

 

Educator

     Her teaching and publications are unified by a commitment to understanding race and gender in the mobility of early modern and postmodern cultures in their literary, performative, and digital forms of expression.

     Beyond Washington, D.C., she holds the John M. Kirk, Jr. Chair in Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Middlebury College's Bread Loaf School of English. She is an affiliate of the University of Witwatersrand's Tsikinya-Chaka Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa, She has served as distinguished visiting professor at the University of Essex in the UK, Yonsei University and Seoul National University in South Korea, and Beijing Normal University and Shandong University in China.

     She held the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Global Shakespeare Studies at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Warwick in the UK. She currently serves as a Fulbright Ambassador.

 

Advocacy Speaker

     In her outreach work as a public humanist, Alexa has given a congressional briefing on the humanities and globalization on Capitol Hill and a TEDx Fulbright talk, been interviewed by the BBC, The Economist, NPR, The Washington Post, and other news outlets, and done advocacy work through the US Department of State.

     Social justice and diversity are key components of Alexa's teaching, research, and service. As a faculty senator, Alexa has been involved in a number of initiatives to foster more inclusive representation of racialized minorities. She has directed the Dean’s Scholars in Shakespeare, a signature program in the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences that played a key role in student recruitment and retention. In the English department, she has served as the director of graduate studies and graduate job placement officer.

     She has brought her expertise in digital humanities to serve her campus as a member of the University Strategic Planning Committee for Online Education, Digital Scholarship Center planning committee, the Institute for Advanced Study of Cultural Heritage Planning Committee, the Advisory Council for Global Humanities, the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning’s Task Force on Digital Literacy and Multimedia Writing, the Columbia College of Arts and Sciences research advisory committee, and others.

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